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20121104
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
believe we have enough technology that we can prevent that to ever happen. of course, if they were a threat to america, we do have to take decisive action, we do have to show our might, and we have to make sure. but i don't want to get it to that point because, ladies and gentlemen, we have the technology. their bombs are not sophisticated enough, and they don't have it. we need to prevent them from getting that technology. we need to stop that immediately. but, of course, if our, if our sovereignty was ever threatened or our friends in the middle east, we need to go after them. >> moderator: senator hatch. hatch: much of what scott has said i agree with, we have to protect our friends in the middle east, and that certainly includes israel. i just want everybody to know how deeply i feel about protecting israel. but also doing well with moderate arab nations so that we can have a relationship over there. but let's face it, we simply cannot allow iran that is dedicated to to blitz ration of israel -- the obliteration of israel and others have a nuclear weapon. we're not going to let
information technology world is going to be driving our entire economy in ways we can't understand now. ewe can tell from doug's niche titch what they look at is going to be significant for all industry. privacy is one part of it, but given the active nature of the current administration, that's just a perfectly ripe area for a tremendous amount of litigation and regulation to break out. i want to make sure i understand it, and i hope you guys will take general up on his invitation to participate in that effort because initiatives coming from the national ag's association can be very, very significant as you all know. >> well, as you all can see, no longer just the down ballot state office holder slot. these ag's are making an impact across the country on a number of issues, and i hope you will stay focused on what they are doing and provide them your input. thank you so much. give them a round of applause. [applause] glnchtsz more from the conference now from the mayor rudy guiliani talking on taxes, health care, energy. he's introduced by tom donohue. >> if i could have your attention, pl
change so quickly. the technology has changed things so rapidly that i think macadamia has a hard time keeping up and knowing what to tell young journalists to do. i am reading a slew of our lists saying, i want specialist's again. that is partly what is happening. the world is moving at such a rapid pace. >> we have a switch that with such a robust media industry for so long, the goal of academia as it applies to media was to protect quality and talk about best practices. whither the death of the media industry, and it is the death, the role has to switch to innovation to figuring out how to protect those values and other things we care about. that itself has to have some element of innovation and creativity. it cannot just be about best practices, these great stories we wrote, that sort of thing. >> if you want to become a documentary filmmaker, where do you learn how to do that? where do you go train? do you pick up your camera? what advice do you give to someone who says i want to be like bernardo ruiz. >> the scared straight documentary, the ex-con goes to talk to a kid. i sometim
for the teaching of english. and we are beginning to see more in the way of exchanges. modern technology has made an elective education a reality. i saw this firsthand. in an engineering competition and the university of colorado. american companies are actively involved in the kingdom's effort to improve k-12 curriculum. keep in mind that saudi arabia is spending 26% of their budget on education. it is third-seeded american educators and businesses are supporting in a big way this modernization effort. there is a careful manage before. saudi arabia took note of this and the government moved with a 138 billion program, all targeted towards the needs and concerns of the populations. i realized that there was criticism in some circles. as if they were buying half the population with increased subsidies. but i have to say but i have to say that the government response was much more sophisticated than that. at the time, we, in the embassy, we listen listened to the top issues facing the saudi arabian population with jobs, houses, will society, and the security apparatus. after it was announced, the p
of a recent conference from detroit focusing on manufacturing technology and entrepreneurial activity in u.s. urban areas, techonomy detroit was a one-day conference in mid september at wayne state university. this portion of the conference includes a panel on do-it-yourself manufacturing and remarks by ben kaufman, the 25-year-old founder and ceo of quirky, a consumer product company that lets consumers decide what they produce. this portion of the conference is just under an hour.ciat >> so the next full segment ofe this program is going to be devoted to the topic of manufacturing and the future of manufacturing in the united states. so i'd like to bring out my longtime colleague when i was at fortune magazine, erick schonfeld, many years the editor of tech crunch. erick schonfeld, please, come out to lead your session on the diy economy. so thank you, erick. [applause] >> thank you. it's great to be here. h let me just quickly introduce our panelists. please have a seat. to my immediate left is grady burnett who's vice president of global marketing at facebook and lived in ann arbor for
landscape, the emergence of new organizations, new technologies that might not be, you know, as responsible end willing to listen to governments but requests not to publish -- are we looking at kind of a new era because of the internet, the fragmentation of the media environment? what kind of challenges might there be for the classification receipt -- regime and for prosecutors going for? >> you mean, a broader journalist puts that's one question. it certainly complicates the issue. let's put it that way. a blogger is not the gray lady of the new york times. that's all i have to say about the subject. [laughter] >> put your finger on today's challenge. this is not just worrying about the occasional article that shows up in the front page of the post and the new york times. your thinking about now whole new types of journalists or media that don't operate under the constraints that are traditional media do. and i give a lot of credit to the "washington post" and the others. when they have classified information that they think would it -- jeopardize information to believe they bring the fact
transactions to a different, a different entity, a different central clearing entity. well, the technology of that is not really well understood at all, and it's hard to have confidence in that. but moreover, it's not clear that without some kind of government sponsorship or government backing or access the liquidity a central clearing facility will have the confidence to avoid, essentially, what would be a run. and while dodd-frank actually provides for some support to central clearing entities -- which, by the way, seems to go mostly unnoticed by critics who say, you know, we've eliminated government support, we've eliminated taxpayer support, we've eliminated the possibility of too big to fail -- we do have a provision that permits intervention to help in a modest way financial, financial utilities like central clearing facilities. however, that's not universal. there's no provision made in europe to support whether directly or indirectly any central clearing facility. so in my mind we've created a series of risks within the derivatives area that were nonexistent before we began this en
but also information technology improvements that have made things possible that were not available in the past. but a lot of these programs are under pressure now. some of it is so explicit political attacks aimed at outreach programs and aimed at the policies that have made it easier for people and on the programs. we also know the state agencies are stretched very thin. there are a lot of demands on them and their funding has been caught and in some we're hearing stories of unemployment insurance and people calling and calling to apply for their benefits and just getting a busy signal over and over again. it is a real opportunity to think about how we can build on the progress we've made so far. how can we prevent it from wearing away and what improvements can we make in the future. in particular, the affordable care act or the health care reform presents an opportunity to make some improvements as we move forward. i am going to wave to reports also available outside of the coalition. one is specifically how the human service programs and their clients can benefit from health car
their own limits. do you believe that the proliferation of drone technology will compel the u.s. to efficiently state its own legal justifications to inform future international debates about drone technology? >> um, you know, if you don't mind, i'm like the rest of you, i have no idea at this point what's classified about this topic at this point and what isn't. so i'm a bit constrained to get into that level of the specifics. i will say this, though, in terms of legal justifications, making public legal justification for what are perceived to be controversial activities, i find it, i find it surpassingly ironic that the obama administration two or three months in office basically declassified all of the olc memos. euphemistically referred to as the torture memos. again, i'm not objective about this because i was the lucky guy who had asked for it and whose name was on all of them. but as you recall, there was the program's over, it's, you know, we need to get, we need transparency to get it out there. american people deserve to know. now, again, i'm only speaking now as a pr
things that we have we learned a because of technology and other allies in the past decade. as as a continual demand, it seems for the resources to get adequate training and to keep to a readiness at the same time dealing with other things that makes this a much more complex issue than many might appreciate and one of the challenges is when it comes time to resources it is done adequately. sorry for the op-ed. but it's really important, and i found in my experience people don't quite understand this because they are not supposed to and i don't expect that they would know. >> tell me a little bit about in your experience what particular things in the tour by difficulties in the military you think have been particularly useful or would be useful in the situations to fight and extend security in the non-traditional ways. >> i can answer that in a lot of different ways. let me start with disaster response. there's been a lot of discussion and a lot of groups over the last eight or ten years about how does the military or other branches of the government, ngos, private enterpris
towards cleaner fuels. this investment of the technology of the future of biomass, or are great jobs here in northern michigan, and we do have a life upon our enemies for our energy sources. >> moderator: thank you. you have a response? benishek: i don't think kerry understands the science of global warming. they talked about yesterday. the fact that there was dredging in the st. clair river may have led to the decrease in late here -- later on in lake erie. >> moderator: mr. mcdowell. would you support changing u.s. postal service retirement system to preserve them. if not, what is your solution to serving populated areas. mcdowell: the postal service is so important in northern michigan. it is where a lot of senior citizens rely on the postal service. but as for communications, but also for prescriptions and other ways to keep them connected to the world. 40% of the post offices were in the first congressional district and they were scheduled to be close. two distribution centers were in the congressional district and the jobs that i state, it is huge for our economy. to make sure that
technology. who sought permission from zeus, the chief god to mary -- to marry the son of the king of troy. 's is not gave his permission trend one to marry a mortal man, but granted her anyone wish she might ask for as a wedding gift. she immediately responded oh zeus, i would ask that this only as would never die. zeus agreed. tran one had many happy years together. but while tran one as all the gods never aged began growing forgetful and wrinkled, feeble and zeus was quite miffed when tran one came back to him and begged him to do something so that the chief god changed the felony is into cicada a well-known insect in the midwest. sometime later but not too long ago, with his strength fading and his memory becoming more porous, the senator said to me one day, you know, jim i think those greeks might have been on to something. [laughter] perhaps that is why george said right here on this stage exactly 20 days ago, when he was hoping the orchestra and they were doing this wonderful performance performance, he said
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)